Category: Sermons, Lectures, and Divrei Torah

Sermons, Lectures, and Divrei Torah

This past Shabbat I gave the Devar Torah in my parent’s synagogue. Not only was this my first time since leaving my pulpit, but it was also the first time I had to speak in Hebrew. Although I’ve been in Ulpan for a few months, I’m still a long way off from being able to speak like a native, let alone infuse my usual sense of personality into my sermons. Thankfully, I did have help not only from Morfix but from friends who could not only correct grammar mistakes, but also assist with idioms and figures of speech. I take full responsibility for all errors.

The following text is from my working draft, though annotated with footnotes. Given my 7 minute time limit, 1 I had to use more “meivin yavin” textual references rather than provide actual citations.

Enjoy!

Notes:

  1. I actually went 8 minutes.

Sermons, Lectures, and Divrei Torah

Since I became a pulpit Rabbi I have rarely posted my sermons. In part this is because with the exception of the High Holidays I don’t write out my sermons word for word, preferring to deliver my sermons with a more conversational tone rather than a monologue. 1 However, given that this was my last Shabbat as Rav of The Stanton St. Shul, I had requests to share my final sermon to the congregation. Even when I do write out sermons in advance, I use my text less as a “published” document and more as a guideline in to ensure my focus. Consequently, the actual sermon I actually deliver occasionally deviates from the text in front of me, not in its essence or point, but in terms of word choices or spur of the moment editorials to include or exclude some material.

I hesitate to call my final sermon a “classic,” but I can say that this is fairly typical of the sermons I would give with its crucial elements being:

  1. A close read of a text, usually as in this case the Bible, but occasionally a Rabbinic teaching.
  2. A message or point based off of the text, presented as a “suggestion” or “possibility” and hopefully relevant to the congregation.
  3. Explicit and/or subtle references to outside works. 2
  4. Optional: explicit or subtle puns, usually bad.
  5. Do all of the above in 10-15 minutes.

Without further ado, the working notes from my final sermon at The Stanton Street Shul, with annotations.

Notes:

  1. Although I was trained to give very formal sermons, I realized early on that not only did that style take substantially more time to prepare, but the extra effort would not have mattered to the congregation. I found the conversational style worked best in my synagogue to communicate ideas, and it allowed the freedom to adlib and respond to hecklers. For the High Holidays when I had to focus my mental energies on managing the service as well as meeting higher expectations, writing out the entire sermon was essential.
  2. I also don’t title my sermons, but if I had to for this one, I’d have used this one, taken from the series finale of ST:TNG.

Sermons, Lectures, and Divrei Torah

This past Shavuot I gave a class titled “The Judaism of Good Intentions” which discussed the role of intentions and consequences – both for good and bad. While I do…

Jewish Thought, Theology, and Machshava Sermons, Lectures, and Divrei Torah

It’s been a long time since I’ve written out sermons, due to a lack of time and an evolving speaking style. Still, I’m finding it useful to have at least some written record of what I say from year to year and people have regularly been requesting I post sermons.1. The following does not represent a “polished” sermon, but rather are the notes from which I give the actual derasha. Even if the flow may be disjointed, the point and the derasha should still be comprehensible.

  1. Protip: It’s best if you actually come to my shul for a Shabbat

Sermons, Lectures, and Divrei Torah

Current Jewish Questions Jewish Law / Halakha Jewish Thought, Theology, and Machshava Sermons, Lectures, and Divrei Torah

Current Jewish Questions Jewish Culture Jewish Law / Halakha Jewish Thought, Theology, and Machshava Judaism Sermons, Lectures, and Divrei Torah

Fundamentals of Judaism Jewish Thought, Theology, and Machshava Sermons, Lectures, and Divrei Torah

Fundamentals of Judaism Jewish Thought, Theology, and Machshava Sermons, Lectures, and Divrei Torah

Confronting Chosenness Jewish Thought, Theology, and Machshava Lectures Sermons, Lectures, and Divrei Torah